Salmon River

 

CAMPING

Camping – Main Stem Salmon River

Camping – North Fork Salmon River

Camping – South Fork Salmon River

Coastal Trail

  1. California Coastal Trail
  2. Hiking the Coastal Trail book by Rob Lorentzen and Richard Nichols
  3. Coastal Trail in Del Norte County
    1. Last Chance Section = 13 miles
    2. DeMartin Section = 12.6 miles
    3. Hidden Beach Section = 7.8 miles
  4. Coastal Trail in Humboldt County
    1. Gold Bluffs Beach Section
    2. Skunk Cabbage Section = 7.6 miles
    3. Redwood Creek Section
    4. Stone Lagoon Section
    5. Big Lagoon Section
    6. Patrick’s Point Section
    7. Stagecoach Road Section
    8. Little River and Clam Beach Section
    9. Hammond Trail
    10. Mad River Beach
    11. Lanphere Dunes
    12. Manila Dunes
    13. Samoa Dunes
    14. Bay Route
    15. Table Bluff Section
    16. Centerville Beach
    17. Mattole Road
    18. Lost Coast Trail
  5. Coastal Trail in Mendocino County
    1. Sinkyone Trail

Bigfoot Trail

  1. Bigfoot Trail Alliance
  2. 360 miles through 32 conifer species in the Klamath Mountains
  3. 8 sections of the Trail:
    1. Yolla Bolly – Middle Eel Wilderness = 33.6 miles
    2. Trinity River Region = 65.2 miles
    3. Trinity Alps Wilderness = 57 miles
    4. Russian Wilderness = 14.3 miles
    5. Marble Mountain Wilderness = 60.9 miles
    6. Red Buttes Wilderness = 41.3 miles
    7. Siskiyou Wilderness = 43.8 miles
    8. Redwood Forest Region = 40.3 miles 
  4. List of conifers species on Bigfoot Trail

bigfoot-trail-route

Lost Coast Headlands

Lost Coast Headlands consists of two moderate trails to secluded, rugged beaches, at the end of the road to Centerville Beach in Ferndale. The first is Fleener Creek Trail, 0.5 miles downhill to the beach. Guthrie Creek Trail is 1.0 miles downhill to the beach. Both can be difficult and possibly unsafe in muddy conditions, especially Guthrie Creek Trail that has a steep muddy patch right before the beach that some people were turning back from. Fleener Creek Trail has a large driftwood pile that must be carefully crossed, or short wood stairs leading to a creek crossing, after a steep muddy descent to the beach that a sign at the trailhead warns about. If you have bad knees or ankles, you might not want to try these trails in winter, and walking poles are recommended.

FLEENER CREEK TRAIL – PHOTOS

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GUTHRIE CREEK TRAIL – PHOTOS

 

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